Unreached people
30 de May de 2018
Unreached people – Ghana 3
6 de June de 2018
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Unreached people – Ghana 2

Last week we called for a long-term mission to Ghana and Chad. We will now, tell a little about the people that you who accept this challenge will find. So get ready for an unforgettable trip. The first people are the GONJA.

Most of the Nanumba are farmers. They grow yams, peanuts, and corn on the open grasslands. Most farm work is done by the men; however, the women often assist in harvesting. The Nanumba also have side occupations such as weaving and carving. Crafted items are used for trade and as a means of subsidizing their meager agricultural earnings. Some of the Nanumba men also leave their homes for several months to work on southern cocoa plantations. Hunting and fishing are also important, and the meat is shared among all of the villagers.

The Nanumba have a relatively low standard of living. Kerosene stoves are available, but other commodities such as electricity and pure drinking water remain very poor. Water is drawn from a dammed river. This poor system causes bone diseases due to the Guinea worms that are prevalent in the water.

The Nanumba live in compact, oval-shaped, walled villages. Each household consists of related men, their wives, and their children. Their round, clay huts must be rebuilt every five years due to rain damage. The villages have no central building. The chief owns the land and leases portions of it to each family.

The Nanumba have a large family system, which is divided into hierarchically arranged clan units. The clan elders exercise moral authority over their units. The chief, who can only be the son of a previous chief, controls the judicial system, while the police enforce social control. The society is patrilineal, which means that the line of descent is traced through the males. However, spiritual attributes are recognized matrilineally, or through the females.

The most famous festival among the Nanumba is the Yam Festival. During this celebration they enjoy singing and dancing. The Nanumba still wear their traditional clothing. The children go to school when they reach the age of six; however, their primary duties include house work. Today, there is one state college in the Nanumba region.

Source: Joshua Project

 

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